2017 FAFO Ocala Arts Festival’s Featured Artist

Dustin Goolsby was raised in Polk County, Florida. As a pacifying hobby for his parents’ sanity, art became a major interest of Dustin’s. Crayons to comics he was led to practicing figurative drawing and this aided his acceptance to Harrison School for the Arts in Lakeland, Florida.

Dustin’s work there was heavily illustrative, with a natural eye for design. However, more expressive fine arts had always been a stronger interest. After high school Dustin decided to attend a small private college in Temple Terrace, Florida. After leaving he started counseling at Summer camps and afterschool programs. Dustin then went on to teach art in private schools, homeschool coops, and private lessons. He then decided art is no longer a hobby, but a life path.


 


Dustin’s current work has developed from his love of rust, patina, chipped paint, age and deterioration. The acrylic medium allows quick layering of story after story on a still surface creating a sort of history. This overlapping of colors and textures expresses his fascination with the decay of both industrial and organic elements. Surfaces which are usually ignored or unseen by many, capture his attention and inspire him to share with the world. Dustin thinks of his art as an extension of what he experiences in these things, and thus expresses how he sees the world.


Links:

DustinGoolsbyArt.com
DustinGoolsbyArt@gmail.com
Facebook: Dustin Goolsby Art
Instagram: dustingoolsbyart (fine art only) Dustingoolsby (photography, art, everyday life)


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FAFO Ocala Arts Festival’s Featured Artist

Jeff Ripple by Meggen Watt

I am dedicated to a poetic realism in landscape painting. For me, that is the artistic combining of an accurate depiction of a scene infused by my emotional response to the light and atmosphere on that landscape. Such a painting may or may not be of a precise location or moment in time, but it is always believable and true to place. I think this is in keeping with 19th Century American painter Asher Durand’s idea that painting nature was “fraught with high and holy meaning” and the job of landscape artists is to reveal “the deep meaning of the real creation around and within us.” Such a painting is probably most fully realized in the studio based on studies of light on landforms, atmosphere, clouds and sky in addition to highly detailed drawings of elements in that landscape, such as trees, rocks, and water. The success of the studio painting depends largely upon the value of the field sketches, and those sketches, in turn, require a deft ability to quickly identify, draw and paint key elements in the scene. As a painter who lives and primarily works in the South, I find myself constantly faced with the conundrum of needing to accurately draw elements of my surroundings while somehow simplifying the scene to include only what is essential to its true nature.


 

My Process

My oil paintings in the field and studio are inspired by intriguing compositions, mood, and atmosphere in the landscape. My style involves carefully planned drawings, a reliance on sketches and studies painted in nature to inform studio work, and a treatment of light and atmosphere reminiscent of 19th Century artists working in the uniquely American Hudson River School and Luminist traditions. Evidence of a human presence is often absent or subordinated in my landscapes.

I am a self-trained artist who relies on rigorous daily practice in drawing and painting as part of my process. I sketch and paint regularly in nature (en plein air). My fieldwork usually involves applying a lot of paint quickly to attain accurate color, values, and forms while seeking specificity in my scene or subject. I then refine those ideas as time permits with a focus on atmosphere and achieving depth.

My work in the studio evolves from graphite composition sketches, field studies (paintings and drawings) and photographs. Studio paintings are generally more contemplative with carefully rendered underpaintings and layers of glazing to achieve a luminous mood and atmosphere.


 

Links:

www.jeffrippleart.com

www.jeffripple.fineartstudioonline.com


 

Selected Awards

2016 Award of Distinction, Mayfaire by the Lake, Lakeland, Florida

2016 Award of Excellence, Santa Fe College Spring Arts Festival, Gainesville, Florida

2016 Best of 2-D, Bonita Springs National Art Festival, Bonita Springs, Florida

2016 Award of Merit, Lake Wales Art Festival, Lake Wales, Florida

2016 Award of Distinction, Art Fest Fort Myers, Fort Myers, Florida

2015 Award of Merit, Deland Fall Festival of the Arts, Deland, Florida

2015 Award of Distinction, Downtown Festival and Art Show, Gainesville, Florida

2015 Award of Excellence, Mainsail Art Festival, St. Petersburg, Florida.

2015 Award of Distinction, Bonita Springs National Art Festival, Bonita Springs, Florida

2015 Judges Choice Award, Images Art Festival, New Smyrna Beach, Florida

2014 Award of Merit, Santa Fe College Spring Arts Festival, Gainesville, Florida

2013 Award of Excellence, Lake Wales Art Festival, Lake Wales, Florida

2013 Award of Distinction, Bonita Springs National Art Festival, Bonita Springs, Florida

2012 Award of Merit, 31st Annual Downtown Festival and Art Show, Gainesville, Florida

2012 FAFO Ocala Arts Festival Award of Distinction, Ocala, Florida

2012 Award of Honor, Halifax Art Festival, Daytona Beach, Florida


 

Selected Permanent Collections

College of Central Florida, Ocala, Florida

University of Central Florida College of Arts and Humanities


 

Publications:

Art of the Sleeping Bear Dunes: Transforming Nature into Art; Edited by Linda Young, Leelanau Press, 2013.


 

Selected Exhibitions

“Art of the Sleeping Bear Dunes,” October 2013-January 2014, Dennos Museum, Traverse City, Michigan.


 


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FAFO Ocala Arts Festival’s Featured Artist

After living in Germany for a number of years, James Carter returned to the United States to attend the Maryland Institute of Art where he received his B.F.A. in 1972. Since then, he has supported himself as a fine artist which included working with Lublin Graphics, a fine art publisher, who also published a book about Mr. Carter’s work which is still available on Amazon.com.

Living in Southbury since 1993, Mr. Carter has exhibited extensively throughout the United States and Europe in major galleries. His work is also included in many corporate collections.

When asked about his work, Mr. Carter said, “I feel my time living in Europe influenced the character and graphic style of my work. But when I returned to the states, my work took on a different dimension. I adopted a more whimsical yet surreal style. I like to employ the underlying humor of reality vs. fantasy. I delight in juxtaposing unexpected objects. The animate and inanimate appear together. By placing real objects in abstract environments, I can make them dissolve, fade, float or move in any way I desire. Eggs are suspended from wires; objects are stacked tenuously atop one another; birds seem to fade in mid-flight.”

The interplay of light and shadows is also important in Mr. Carter’s work. Color is almost secondary and used to add perspective and depth than out of primary concern for color itself. “Through my paintings, I strive to give the viewer a fresh, whimsical view of familiar-and some not so familiar situations,” said Mr. Carter.

The creation of Mr. Carter’s work is achieved by the use of airbrush and traditional brushwork. Mr. Carter finds The airbrush to be an amazing tool because it allows an artist to get tones and textures which can’t be achieved with a standard paint brush.

Mr. Carter’s work is created on both canvas and illustration board which is first primed and repeatedly sanded to produce a smooth, tight and realistic subject matter.



In Mr. Carter’s Words:

“The creation of my acrylic paintings is achieved by the use of airbrush and traditional brush work. The airbrush is an amazing tool because it allows me to get tones and textures which can’t be achieved with a standard paint brush. My work is done on both canvas and illustration board which is first primed with gesso and repeatedly sanded to produce a smooth, tight and realistic subject matter.

I like to employ the underlying humor of the surreal and delight in juxtaposing unexpected objects. The animate and inanimate interact in my paintings in ways you would never conceive as possible. By placing real objects and animals in abstract environments I can make them dissolve, fade, float or move in any way I desire.

The interplay of light and shadows is also important in my work. Color is almost secondary and used to add perspective and depth than out of primary concern for color itself. Through my paintings, I strive to give the viewer a fresh, whimsical view of familiar-and some not so familiar situations.”


Visit James Carter’s website


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